Vögel, Vögel, Vögel

am
Von kalten und warmen Tagen

Irgendwie sind einige Vögel durchgerutscht, die ich noch an den frostigen Tagen fotografiert hatte. Dauernd ist irgendwas, deshalb jetzt alle Vögel auf einmal.

Das beste Bild des Monats ist wohl diese Wacholderdrossel Turdus pilaris. Ich war eigentlich auf der Suche nach den Rotdrosseln, die hier im Winter durchziehen. Immerhin ist es eine Drossel, so oder so ;-) Die Wacholderdrossel sehe ich hier in der Stadt meist in Parks, hier im Garten eher selten, aber bei der Kälte vor zwei Wochen lockten die Beeren hier dann doch.

Wacholderdrossel mit schicker Strickjacke in Zopf- oder Fischgratmuster ;-)

Enten im Winter.

Auch Möwen waren dort. Es gibt so viele Arten. Von der Größe her waren die beiden sehr gegensätzlich.

Kohlmeise Parus major beim täglichen Geschäft :-)

An den kalten Tagen sammelten sich viele Krähen Corvus (Saat- und Rabenkrähen) und Dohlen Corvus monedula in den Bäumen zwischen den Häusern. Jetzt sind auch noch welche da, aber nicht mehr so viele. War vermutlich angenehm warm hier.

Many of these pictures are from the cold days 2 or 3 weeks ago. So many things happened so I forgot them. I was looking for a kind of Turdus, Turdus iliacus, that are winter guests here, but instead I met Turdus pilaris, the bird on the first picture. The nice feathers remind me of cable pattern or herringbone pattern ;-)

Then I saw ducks on frozen water. The days were very cold (up to minus 10 degrees and minus 17 in the night) and the ducks looked like they just wanted to be left alone. At the canal are different kind of seagulls. They live here all year round. Then I could observe the Great tit Parus major, which is always making me smile.

On the cold days many crows came to the houses to stay in the big trees overnight. Now there are only a few, but then there were really many, one or two hundred I suppose. The town with all the houses must have been warmer than the woods. Every evening there was a shouting and trumpeting and it took a long time till all birds had settled. Often they started to fly around again and again.

20 Kommentare Gib deinen ab

  1. So manche an sich interessante studie versackt bei mir auch in den Archiven.
    Zumindest sollte man diese funde katalogisieren, um sie wiederfinden zu können.
    Das habe ich nicht gemacht…bisher.

    Schöne vogelstudien, da bin ich Laie leider.

    Gefällt 2 Personen

    1. pflanzwas sagt:

      Manchmal ist es aber auch ganz nett, sich selbst zu überraschen. Ach, daß war auch noch?! Tja, bei so inflationären Knipsern, wie wir es sind, geht schon mal was unter ;-)

      Gefällt 2 Personen

      1. Gell?! Es macht einfach spass mit einer Kamera.
        Hätte ich nie gedacht.😃

        Gefällt 2 Personen

        1. pflanzwas sagt:

          Ja, man sieht noch mal ganz anders auf die Welt und daß ist toll und macht für einen selbst auch mehr sichtbar.

          Gefällt 1 Person

  2. Ule Rolff sagt:

    Wer ist das denn auf dem dritten Foto? Den hübschen Kleinen kenne ich gar nicht.

    Gefällt 1 Person

    1. pflanzwas sagt:

      Das sollte, wie auf dem 1. und 2. Bild, eine Wacholderdrossel sein. Nur an einem der eisigkalten Tage und etwas runder wegen Kälte :-)

      Gefällt 1 Person

      1. Ule Rolff sagt:

        Ich habe sie als viel kleiner eingeordnet als die beiden ersten Wacholderdrosseln, mehr so in Spatzengröße … 👀

        Gefällt 1 Person

        1. pflanzwas sagt:

          Macht wohl die Perspektive ;-)

          Gefällt 1 Person

  3. Die Drossel ist wirklich sehr hübsch.

    Gefällt 1 Person

  4. naturfund.de sagt:

    Schönes Bild von der schönen Wacholderdrossel. Das surreale Bild (der Begriff kam mir sofort beim Betrachten und bevor ich noch dein Bildunterschrift Gelsen hatte) hat etwas :-)

    Gefällt 1 Person

  5. Die Wacholderdrossel hat wunderbar für Dich posiert, liebe Almuth. Die Details ihres Federkleides finde ich einfach genial. So ein schöner Vogel.

    Gefällt 1 Person

    1. pflanzwas sagt:

      Ja, das war wirklich toll. So hübsch habe ich sie vorher gar nicht wahrgenommen, aber das Zopfmuster ist richtig schick :-) Danke Tanja.

      Gefällt 1 Person

  6. bluebrightly sagt:

    I love that pattern on the feathers of T. pilaris. Except for the pattern and color, that bird looks exactly like our Turdus migratorius (American robin). They are busy pulling up worms in the grass now. :-) Parus major is like our Chickadee, but yours is cuter. Crows roost in enormous flocks here in the winter and are very noisy as they get settled, just like you describe. I think you’re right, there was warmth emanating from that house on the cold nights.
    When I was about 18 or so I saw a duck that was frozen into the ice on a lake. The end of its wing was completely stuck in the ice. It was struggling to get away but couldn’t. I wanted to help but I was too far away. Very sad. I don’t know if it got free but I suppose someone else saw it and figured out a way to help because it was not in a wild area – there were houses nearby.
    Today Joe & I saw thousands of Snow geese rise up into the air because a Bald eagle was chasing them. I photographed something like that last year and posted it. They are here all winter but will leave soon for Russia.

    Gefällt 1 Person

    1. pflanzwas sagt:

      Your Turdus migratorius really looks very simialar! The colors are great. It must be a nice sight in winter time!. Oh dear, frozen ducks. Yes, it happens from time to time. Some people here call the fire departement in this case. Sometimes you can’t help. But maybe it was lucky and came free through other help!
      Thousands of snow geese, how beautiful! It must be amazing. I suppose you got goose bumps :-) So there is a lot of birdlife going on in your area right now. Time for changes isn’t it it.

      Gefällt mir

    2. pflanzwas sagt:

      PS The snow geese come from Russia? A long route.

      Gefällt 1 Person

      1. bluebrightly sagt:

        Yes, they’re pretty damn good flyers. ;-) Oh, goosebumps – that is TERRIBLE! You sound like Joe now. :-) In the fields where potatoes and other crops are grown, there are also thousands of wild swans – not the ones you see in castles, a different species (actually two species). They will leave soon, too. It’s wonderful to have the swans & geese here every winter.
        I’m surprised that you have heard of ducks getting caught like that. It made a big impression on me. I suppose you’re right, it must happen regularly and we can only hope the ice thaws or someone helps.

        Gefällt 1 Person

        1. pflanzwas sagt:

          What about the goosebumps? I wanted to ask if the sight of all these birds make you shiver? It is so touching and I think I might have got goosebumps :-)

          Gefällt 1 Person

          1. bluebrightly sagt:

            I just meant that you made a very funny – or terribly funny – pun when you suggested that seeing thousands of geese gave me goosebumps. :-) We always joke that it’s terrible when someone makes a pun.
            Did I get goosebumps? Maybe, I don’t remember. I remember smiling and feeling thrilled. When they get frightened and all fly up at once, the noise they make is very loud. It’s a great experience.

            Gefällt 1 Person

            1. pflanzwas sagt:

              Okay, now I get it. Thrilled is probably a better word – or so ;-) I wish I could have seen it too.

              Gefällt mir

Kommentar verfassen: Bitte beachten Sie, dass wordpress.com Ihre Daten beim Kommentieren erhebt.

Trage deine Daten unten ein oder klicke ein Icon um dich einzuloggen:

WordPress.com-Logo

Du kommentierst mit Deinem WordPress.com-Konto. Abmelden /  Ändern )

Google Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Google-Konto. Abmelden /  Ändern )

Twitter-Bild

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Twitter-Konto. Abmelden /  Ändern )

Facebook-Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Facebook-Konto. Abmelden /  Ändern )

Verbinde mit %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.